Plenary Speakers

Since 2018, the year of the last wonderful PNG2018 workshop in Prague, we crossed a pandemic and period of forced immobility. Four years after, we will be finally over and we will be able to get together in Rome at the PNG 2022! In the quickly growing field of gels, four years is a very long time lapse. We are working to prepare the meeting at our best and we can already announce the four Plenary Speakers that will share with us what are the latest accomplishments of their labs in different aspects of Gels. Here below a shortlist of the confirmed plenary speakers:

Piero Baglioni

University of Florence, Italy

Piero Baglioni has contributed to many aspects of colloids. In his plenary, he will present some of the recent achievements of his research activity focused on the Conservation of Cultural Heritage, and in particular on the application of chemical gels to the conservation of modern and contemporary art.

Francesco Sciortino

Sapienza, University of Rome

Francesco Sciortino interests span from the thermodynamic of supercooled water to the physics of glassy systems to colloidal self-assembly, conjugating theoretical and experimental approaches. In the last decade, he has focused on colloidal gelation, exploring the possible routes to dynamic arrest. His plenary will report on the collective behavior of DNA-made nanoparticles, a model system for realizing in the laboratory empty liquids, equilibrium gels, re-entrant gels, swapping gels, and interpenetrating network.

Dror Seliktar

Israel Institute of Technology of Haifa, Technion, Israel

Dror Seliktar has worked to revolutionize regenerative medicine with the introduction of a novel “biosynthetic hybrid” hydrogel for 3D cell culture, cell-therapy, tissue engineering, and bioprinting. He is the inventor of Gelrin™ and founder of the company Regents Biomaterials Ltd. and heads a multi-national collaborative effort to apply biomaterial-based strategies for tissue regeneration and beyond. His plenary will be focused on the recent applications of gels in regenerative medicine, bioprinting, and medical diagnostics.

David Weitz

Harvard University, USA

Weitz received his PhD in physics from Harvard University and then joined Exxon Research and Engineering Company, where he worked for nearly 18 years. He then became a professor of physics at the University of Pennsylvania and moved to Harvard at the end of the last millennium as a professor of physics and applied physics. He leads a group studying soft matter science with a focus on materials science, biophysics, microfluidics, and flow in porous media. Several startup companies have come from his lab to commercialize research concepts.